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The Rope: A Novel by [Kanan Makiya]

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The Rope: A Novel Kindle Edition

4.2 out of 5 stars 39 ratings

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Review

" The Dust that Falls from Dreams "is modeled on John Galsworthy s "Forsyte Saga. . . . "A feast of a novel . . . This book is very much a hit.
John Sutherland, "The Times "(London)
De Bernieres . . . spins a masterful tale that bridges two worlds and delineates the apocalyptic abyss in between. . . . This heartrending saga of love, loss, and endurance paints a vivid portrait of the steep price paid by an entire generation of young men and women who participated in and endured the Great War.
Margaret Flanagan, "Booklist""

Masterly. . . . [Full of] pathos, lyricism and depth. " The New York Times Book Review"
Powerful. . . . Full of wonders. . . . Dares to examine exactly when, why and how the outcrop of stone that was believed to be the site of the ancient temple of Solomon already sacred to both Judaism and Christianity was first claimed as a holy place by Islam . . . thus establishing Jerusalem as ground zero in the bloody and enduring conflict among the three great monotheistic faiths. . . . Could not be more timely. "Los Angeles Times"
Important and imaginative. . . . Solid, interesting, accessible, and highly illuminating. "The Washington Post Book World""

Americans know very little about Iraq, and this was as true at the beginning of our war there as it is today. Now Kanan Makiya has written a fictionalized narrative of the first years of the American occupation, seen from the Iraqi (and the Shi ite) side. His book is a remarkable evocation of those terrible years, simultaneously informative, scary, worrying, and deeply engaging. Start reading it and you won t stop and don t skip the beautifully written, morally and politically powerful personal note at the end. Michael Walzer, author of "Just and Unjust Wars
" A searing novel of the Iraq War from an Iraqi point of view, with Saddam Hussein in a starring role. Our narrator has no name, but The Tyrant certainly does, and it is on every tongue. As Makiya s novel opens, Saddam's body is swaying in the breeze, having been transferred by The Occupier to the Iraqis as proof of our independence from the American invaders. Into that brief phrase a whole world is packed: the Americans are unwanted conquerors, the rulers of Iraq are exiles driven to hang Saddam out of revenge, or blood libel, or communal solidarity, and a once-coherent nation, for better or worse, is now splintered irreparably . A close study of the psychology of oppression and dictatorship, of a piece with the author's now classic nonfiction study Republic of Fear (1989). " Kirkus Reviews, "*starred review*"
"
Astutely challenging deeply resonant .Nuanced and essential reading for every global citizen, this novel proves that all politics are personal. " Booklist""

Mr. Makiya loves Iraq or the idea of what a new Iraq could be and his rage and despair at the brutality that has seized his country comes through on every page .Mr. Makiya s writing is sublime when his subject is the slide from decency to evil. His depiction of the descent into barbarism of Haider, one of the central character s closest friends, is as good a portrait as we are likely to get of Iraq s post-Saddam savagery .The book is an indispensable guide into the warehouses of cruelty of the modern Middle East and gives us a better idea of why Iraq failed after being liberated from a tyrant, and why Sunnis and Shiites now so eagerly kill each other. " "Reuel Marc Gerecht, "Wall Street Journal"
Americans know very little about Iraq, and this was as true at the beginning of our war there as it is today. Now Kanan Makiya has written a fictionalized narrative of the first years of the American occupation, seen from the Iraqi (and the Shi ite) side. His book is a remarkable evocation of those terrible years, simultaneously informative, scary, worrying, and deeply engaging. Start reading it and you won t stop and don t skip the beautifully written, morally and politically powerful personal note at the end. Michael Walzer, author of "Just and Unjust Wars
" A searing novel of the Iraq War from an Iraqi point of view, with Saddam Hussein in a starring role. Our narrator has no name, but The Tyrant certainly does, and it is on every tongue. As Makiya s novel opens, Saddam's body is swaying in the breeze, having been transferred by The Occupier to the Iraqis as proof of our independence from the American invaders. Into that brief phrase a whole world is packed: the Americans are unwanted conquerors, the rulers of Iraq are exiles driven to hang Saddam out of revenge, or blood libel, or communal solidarity, and a once-coherent nation, for better or worse, is now splintered irreparably . A close study of the psychology of oppression and dictatorship, of a piece with the author's now classic nonfiction study Republic of Fear (1989). " Kirkus Reviews, "*starred review*"
"
A razor-sharp dissection of the post-Saddam unraveling through the eyes of a fictional Shiite militiaman highbrow, brilliant. "" New York Magazine""
Set in Iraq soon after the toppling of Saddam Hussein, this novel follows an unnamed Shiite soldier in one of many militias jockeying for power. As he strives to understand the complex political, spiritual, and military world around him, he confronts convoluted loyalties and gruesome betrayals within his own family .Succeeds in its passionate dramatization of a mind-set still poorly understood by the American reader. " The New Yorker"
Astutely challenging deeply resonant .Nuanced and essential reading for every global citizen, this novel proves that all politics are personal. " Booklist
" Makiya s book is a challenge to Iraqis many of whom are fed up with their corrupt leaders to stop blaming the West and confront the officials who are destroying their country. He believes that only some form of federalism that rises above a strict Shiite-Sunni divide can save the country. The novel couldn t be more timely. Last week Sadr s followers invaded the Shiite-led government green zone for the second time in a month, purportedly protesting against corruption but really seeking more power. As Sayyid Majid s death makes clear, Iraqi Shiites must first stop killing one another before the country can emerge from chaos. That is the harsh truthThe Ropewants Iraqis to face. "" Philadelphia Inquirer"""
" Powerful .By keeping his creation torn and anguished as he digests unpalatable facts, Makiya forces us to sympathise, to see his character as a human as well as a soldier, a lost boy gulled into believing anything and duped into doing the dirty work of others. Malcolm Forbes, ""The National "(Abu Dhabi)""

"Mr. Makiya loves Iraq--or the idea of what a new Iraq could be--and his rage and despair at the brutality that has seized his country comes through on every page....Mr. Makiya's writing is sublime when his subject is the slide from decency to evil. His depiction of the descent into barbarism of Haider, one of the central character's closest friends, is as good a portrait as we are likely to get of Iraq's post-Saddam savagery....The book is an indispensable guide into the 'warehouses of cruelty' of the modern Middle East and gives us a better idea of why Iraq failed after being liberated from a tyrant, and why Sunnis and Shiites now so eagerly kill each other."
--Reuel Marc Gerecht, Wall Street Journal

"Americans know very little about Iraq, and this was as true at the beginning of our war there as it is today. Now Kanan Makiya has written a fictionalized narrative of the first years of the American occupation, seen from the Iraqi (and the Shi'ite) side. His book is a remarkable evocation of those terrible years, simultaneously informative, scary, worrying, and deeply engaging. Start reading it and you won't stop--and don't skip the beautifully written, morally and politically powerful personal note at the end." --Michael Walzer, author of Just and Unjust Wars

"A searing novel of the Iraq War from an Iraqi point of view, with Saddam Hussein in a starring role. Our narrator has no name, but The Tyrant certainly does, and it is on every tongue. As Makiya's novel opens, Saddam's body is swaying in the breeze, having been transferred by The Occupier to the Iraqis as 'proof of our independence from the American invaders.' Into that brief phrase a whole world is packed: the Americans are unwanted conquerors, the rulers of Iraq are exiles driven to hang Saddam out of 'revenge, or blood libel, or communal solidarity, ' and a once-coherent nation, for better or worse, is now splintered irreparably.... A close study of the psychology of oppression and dictatorship, of a piece with the author's now classic nonfiction study Republic of Fear (1989)." --Kirkus Reviews, *starred review*

"A razor-sharp dissection of the post-Saddam unraveling through the eyes of a fictional Shiite militiaman...highbrow, brilliant."
--New York Magazine

"Set in Iraq soon after the toppling of Saddam Hussein, this novel follows an unnamed Shiite soldier in one of many militias jockeying for power. As he strives to understand the complex political, spiritual, and military world around him, he confronts convoluted loyalties and gruesome betrayals within his own family....Succeeds in its passionate dramatization of a mind-set still poorly understood by the American reader." --The New Yorker

"Astutely challenging...deeply resonant....Nuanced and essential reading for every global citizen, this novel proves that all politics are personal."--Booklist

"Makiya's book is a challenge to Iraqis--many of whom are fed up with their corrupt leaders--to stop blaming the West and confront the officials who are destroying their country. He believes that only some form of federalism--that rises above a strict Shiite-Sunni divide--can save the country. The novel couldn't be more timely. Last week Sadr's followers invaded the Shiite-led government "green zone" for the second time in a month, purportedly protesting against corruption but really seeking more power. As Sayyid Majid's death makes clear, Iraqi Shiites must first stop killing one another before the country can emerge from chaos. That is the harsh truth The Rope wants Iraqis to face." --Philadelphia Inquirer

"Powerful....By keeping his creation torn and anguished as he digests unpalatable facts, Makiya forces us to sympathise, to see his character as a human as well as a soldier, a lost boy gulled into believing anything and duped into doing the dirty work of others." --Malcolm Forbes, The National (Abu Dhabi)

--This text refers to the hardcover edition.

About the Author

KANAN MAKIYA was born in Baghdad. He is the author of several books, including the best-selling Republic of Fear, The Monument, The Rock, and the award-winning Cruelty and Silence. He is the Sylvia K. Hassenfeld Professor of Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies at Brandeis University. He lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts.
--This text refers to the hardcover edition.

Product details

  • ASIN ‏ : ‎ B0104EOGNI
  • Publisher ‏ : ‎ Pantheon (15 March 2016)
  • Language ‏ : ‎ English
  • File size ‏ : ‎ 2908 KB
  • Text-to-Speech ‏ : ‎ Enabled
  • Screen Reader ‏ : ‎ Supported
  • Enhanced typesetting ‏ : ‎ Enabled
  • X-Ray ‏ : ‎ Not Enabled
  • Word Wise ‏ : ‎ Enabled
  • Print length ‏ : ‎ 337 pages
  • Customer Reviews:
    4.2 out of 5 stars 39 ratings

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Nick Pultorak
5.0 out of 5 stars Amazingly Revealing and Powerfully Written
Reviewed in the United States on 4 February 2021
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edward thorp
5.0 out of 5 stars If you want to understand the Middle East, Iraq ...
Reviewed in the United States on 10 June 2016
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MartyFrenich
5.0 out of 5 stars I can only read it in small doses. It ...
Reviewed in the United States on 25 May 2016
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Kayes Ahmed
2.0 out of 5 stars Too much inside baseball
Reviewed in the United States on 12 September 2016
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Hammarhead
3.0 out of 5 stars Rope: a novel is a story of Iraq after the death of "the tyrant"
Reviewed in the United States on 28 March 2016
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